Let's Go SC

Learn to Move More

Looking for ways to be more active in South Carolina? The Move More Blog is the only resource you need to stay active and learn about ways to move more for better health. Know what you're looking for? Try the search term box to look for specific topics and resources.

  • Staying Active in Warm Weather Staying Active in Warm Weather 07/08/2016 Ample sunshine, longer days and warmer temperatures provide more opportunities for the whole family to get outside and get active!

    summertimeAmple sunshine, longer days and warmer temperatures provide more opportunities for the whole family to get outside and get active! Try walking, swimming, biking, skating, jumping rope, building a backyard obstacle course, or organizing a neighborhood soccer game. Even gardening, pushing a stroller or walking the dog counts. Learn the American Heart Association's Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adultsand the recommendations in children.

    But when the temperature goes up, being active outdoors can be more challenging. It's easier to become overheated when the sun is beaming down all day. The warm months also bring humidity to many parts of the country. With humidity, your sweat doesn'۪t evaporate as quickly, so your body has a harder time releasing heat. Download our Warm Weather Fitness Guide!

    Tips to keep in mind

    1. Timing is key: Try to avoid exercising outside in the early afternoon. It'۪s usually hottest between noon and 3 p.m.
    2. Hydrate: Drink water before, during and after physical activity, even if you don't feel thirsty. Bring a bottle of water with you, or plan water stops along your route.
    3. Dress for success: Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothes. Moisture-wicking fabric can also be a big help. Protect yourself from the sun with sunglasses, a hat or visor and plenty of sweat-resistant sunscreen.
    4. Listen to your body: Take frequent breaks in the shade, and drink water before you'۪re thirsty. Allow yourself time to adapt to the heat — some experts say that this can take about 4-14 days. You may not be able to work out as long or as hard as usual when it's very hot.
    5. Doctor'۪s orders: Check with your healthcare professional before starting an exercise routine or moving your workout outdoors if you have cardiovascular disease, diabetes, other chronic disease or any medical concerns. Certain medications like beta blockers, ace receptor blockers, ace inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and diuretics can exaggerate the body'۪s response to heat.
    6. Buddy up: If you can, work out with a partner for safety … and fun!

    Keep cool as you refuel

    Try light, healthy pre- and post-workout snacks that can also help you stay cool, such as:

    • Chilled or frozen fruit
    • Homemade popsicles made from 100 percent fruit juice
    • Fruit smoothies
    • Cold salads loaded with vegetables, beans, legumes and heart-healthy fish like albacore tuna or salmon
    • Crisp, chilled raw veggies like cucumber, carrot or celery with a light, cool dip
    • Cold sparkling water with a splash of 100% fruit juice or slices of citrus or cucumber

    Beat the heat

    If you find you just can'۪t tolerate the heat, don'۪t skip out on your workout or physical activity time!

    • Find indoor locations where you can be active, such as a shopping mall, gym or community recreation center.
    • Discover activities you can do in your home or at work.
    • Adjust your workout schedule to early morning or late evening when it's cooler outside.

    Know the signs of heat-related conditions

    According to the National Institutes of Health, heat illnesses or emergencies can occur with exposure to high temperatures and humidity.

    Dehydration can occur when you don'۪t replace body fluids lost by sweating. Being even slightly dehydrated can make you feel bad and put you at greater risk for heat-related illnesses like heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

    Watch for these signs of mild to moderate dehydration:

    • Thirst
    • Dry or sticky mouth
    • Dry, cool skin
    • Headache
    • Muscle cramps
    • Not urinating much or darker-colored urine

    Signs of severe dehydration:

    • Not urinating or very dark-colored urine
    • Dry, shriveled skin
    • Irritability or confusion
    • Dizziness or lightheadedness
    • Rapid heartbeat
    • Breathing rapidly
    • Fatigue or listlessness
    • Unconsciousness

    Heat cramps are the first stage of heat illness and can share some of the symptoms of dehydration:

    • Muscle cramps and pains, often in the legs or abdomen
    • Very heavy sweating
    • Fatigue
    • Thirst

    Heat exhaustion symptoms include:

    • Headache
    • Dizziness or lightheadedness
    • Weakness
    • Cool, moist skin
    • Dark urine
    • Nausea and vomiting

    If you experience signs of dehydration, heat cramps or heat exhaustion:

    • Stop exercising right away.
    • Sip water or suck on ice cubes.
    • Move to the shade or indoors as soon as possible.
    • Douse yourself with cold water.
    • Apply cold, wet cloths to the neck, groin and armpits.
    • Seek medical attention if your condition doesn'۪t improve or gets worse.

    Heat stroke is when the body is no longer able to regulate its temperature, and it keeps rising. This is very serious and requires immediate medical attention.

    Call 9-1-1 and take the actions above right away if you experience these symptoms:

    • High fever (above 104 degrees F)
    • Hot, dry, red skin
    • Fast, weak pulse
    • Fast, shallow breathing
    • Irrational behavior or extreme confusion
    • Seizure or unconsciousness
  • Adventure Abounds in Poinsett State Park Adventure Abounds in Poinsett State Park Deanna Anderson | 06/29/2016 Poinsett is quickly becoming the premier location for mountain bikers and hikers.

    PoinsettAs far as State Parks go, Poinsett may be tucked away and less famous than Sesqui, Table Rock, or Myrtle Beach State Parks. But, Poinsett is quickly becoming the premier location for mountain bikers and hikers.

    With almost twenty-miles of trails, campgrounds or cabins, and only twenty minutes from Sumter, Poinsett is the perfect get away for nature and outdoor enthusiasts.  The park also offers a variety of other activities such as swimming, boating, fishing, stand-up paddle boards, and educational programs.  Every year it hosts Take A Kid Mountain Biking, First Day Hikes, National Trails Day, and the Knot Mountain Bike Race; all of which support the community and encourage outdoor and active lifestyles.

    All of the trails in Poinsett are multi-use for both hikers or mountain bikers, vary in length from 1.5 miles to 5.3 miles, and intersect so trails cab be combined for a longer adventure.  Easy to read trail maps are provided in the Ranger�۪s Office and all of the rangers are very knowledgeable about the trails and can tell you which trail best suits your needs.  The trails are color-coded with clear tree blazes in corresponding colors; making these trails easy for even basic or beginner hikers to follow.

    In addition to the great trails inside the park, the Palmetto Trail also cuts right through the park, utilizing pre-existing trails.  The Palmetto Trail is a 400-plus mile trail that bisects our state in half and is maintained by the Palmetto Conservation Foundation.  It is divided into different sections and can be day- or thru-hiked.  The Wateree Passage starts in Manchester State Forest (which surrounds Poinsett), becomes the High Hills of Santee Passage as it enters Poinsett and then meanders out of the park and down to Mill Creek and the Lake Marion Passage.  The Palmetto Trail adds another 20+ miles of trail near Poinsett.

    Dubbed the ���mountains of the Midlands�۝ it is part of the sand hills region—meaning that millions of years ago it was the beach of the ocean—and the diversity of plant life astounds even avid naturalists.  It is one of the few places people can see Spanish Moss draped from a Mountain Laurel.  Poinsett is also rife with history.  It was once a rice plantation, a grist mill (ruins of the mill can still be seen there today), and was one of the parks built by the Civilian Conservation Corp in the 1930�۪s.

    Camping is available for primitive sites, with water and electric hook-up, or RV hookups and the campgrounds, as well as other facilities, are always immaculately clean.  The rangers are like family, and the activities offered are simpler and quieter without the hustle and bustle of more tourist destinations.

    Call Poinsett today or visit their website and make arrangements to visit this quaint park.  Spend the day or spend the weekend at Poinsett and fall in love with outdoor adventure all over again.

  • Brockman Elementary: Creating a Culture of Wellness Brockman Elementary: Creating a Culture of Wellness Elizabeth Gerndt | 06/08/2016 Open community use makes Brockman welcoming to everyone.

    brockman“Any of our families will tell you… they always feel welcome here,” explains Brockman Elementary School Principal Dr. Eunice Williams. One way this inviting attitude is apparent is through the school’s open community use of their outdoor recreational facilities. Due in part to its location within a residential neighborhood in Forest Acres, families and community members can easily access the school and often use the property in a variety of ways. The school has multiple playgrounds, a small track, and a softball field that are all available for use by families and neighbors. The playgrounds are gated and locked during the school day and while aftercare is in session for the safety of staff and students. However, the gates remain unlocked afterwards and until the last custodian leaves at 9:30 p.m. On Friday afternoons, the gates are intentionally left unlocked so that families are able to access the playgrounds all weekend. Brockman keeps families informed of this practice through communications such as the school’s biweekly newsletter.

    A few steps were necessary before Brockman Elementary was able to open their outdoor facilities to the community outside of school hours. When Dr. Williams first started at Brockman three years ago, a number of updates were needed to make the property safer. These updates were possible thanks to strong parent involvement and fundraising through the school’s Parent Teacher Organization and Fine Arts Boosters. Dr. Williams points to open communication and strong relationships with parents and neighbors as a crucial aspect to making open community use a success. She believes open community use has helped make her school a safer environment for everyone by increasing community ownership of the property and pride for the school. Brockman Elementary has not experienced any problems with littering or vandalism as a result of allowing open community use. In order to avoid problems with property damage, Dr. Williams recommends that other schools that may be interested in allowing open community use work diligently to clearly communicate rules and expectations and establish an understanding of why those rules are in place.

    Open community use is just one of many ways Brockman Elementary School illustrates that establishing a culture of wellness is a top priority. Rather than participating in traditional fundraising activities, such as selling cookie dough, Brockman participates in an annual FUNd RUN where students pledge to walk/run/move while gathering family and friends to sponsor their efforts. The school also hosts an afterschool running club called Bears on Track with over 40 runners and 10 coaches. Because of its efforts to promote a healthy lifestyle for their students, families and community, Brockman has been recognized with the National Healthy Schools Bronze Award from the Alliance for a Healthier Generation for the past two years. Dr. Williams knows the value of having parents involved and engaged in order to teach why focusing on health is so important. She points to open community use as just another part of this parent education, saying, “I think it’s great to see our families on the playgrounds with our kids because I think it’s a bonding time, time spent away from an electronic device, time out in fresh air, and that’s exactly what we want. That’s a part of our parent education. Spend time with your children in a positive environment, and if it’s here, that’s fine.”

    The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is encouraging schools and districts to expand open community use statewide. Healthy Eating/Active Living coordinators from DHEC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity are providing assistance and guidance in an effort to convince schools across South Carolina to make their outdoor facilities available for public use to promote physical activity, healthy lifestyles, and stronger communities.

  • McCracken Middle School: Safe Access for the Community McCracken Middle School: Safe Access for the Community Sandra Sessions | 05/25/2016 McCracken Middle School is a school that believes in community involvement and opportunities for every child.

    McCrackenMcCracken Middle School, located in District 7 of Spartanburg County, is a school that firmly believes in community involvement and limitless opportunities for every child. One of the many things that make this school such a welcoming and essential part of the community is that McCracken Middle practices open community use, which allows members of the community safe access to the outdoor facilities on campus.

    The people of Spartanburg have access to the track, basketball courts, sidewalks, tennis courts, and other blacktop areas during the open community use hours. Members of the community walk the sidewalk in front of the school throughout the day. McCracken Middle School has made a simple agreement with the City of Spartanburg, which makes this movement possible. The school unlocks the gate on school days, and the city closes it in the evenings. The city is responsible for providing access on weekends, holidays, and during the summer. These joint efforts ensure that the residents of Spartanburg can use the school grounds and play equipment at their convenience.

    The results of this movement demonstrate that members of the community are becoming more active and more social. Walking groups and friendships are established among frequent visitors, along with a sense of caring and pride in the community. Principal Margaret Peach sees this as an opportunity to invite the community to see the splendor of McCracken Middle, and to build relationships with people who might not have children enrolled in the school. Open community use welcomes the public to be a part of the community. Principal Peach notes that open community use is very important to the area because of the loss of open space as a result of the decreasing size of home lots and an increasing number of students living in apartments. The school campus is a valuable resource for physical activity because it is central to the community, accessible, safe and free.

    Trash accumulation and vandalism are common concerns associated with open community use. However, Principal Peach has noticed the opposite occurring. The public�۪s growing sense of community from participation in open community use has prompted residents to take greater responsibility in picking up trash left behind by others. Also, the Environmental Science class at McCracken Middle takes time during class hours to pick up trash. Even with the increased use of the school grounds, vandalism has not been an issue.

    The school has also instituted a ���no pet�۝ policy, including signage that clearly states the policy to avoid animal waste and other problems that might occur. Like any successful policy, teamwork is a crucial component that is necessary to continue the success of open community use. All staff members are involved in the process, from the school district superintendent and principal to the district safety coordinator and maintenance staff. Open community use has undoubtedly been a benefit to McCracken Middle School, as well as the entire local community.

    The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is encouraging schools and districts to expand open community use statewide. Healthy Eating/Active Living coordinators from DHEC�۪s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity are providing assistance and guidance in an effort to convince schools across South Carolina to make their outdoor facilities available for public use to promote physical activity, healthy lifestyles and stronger communities.

  • Entitlement to a Safe Environment Entitlement to a Safe Environment Sandra Sessions | 05/25/2016 Boiling Springs Middle believes that all people are entitled to a safe and supportive environment.

    boilingspringsBoiling Springs Middle School, located in Inman, SC, believes that all people are entitled to a safe and supportive environment. The school is known for being student-centered and inviting. One example of what makes Boiling Springs Middle School such a safe and inviting part of the community is its attitude towards open community use of their outdoor facilities.
    Outdoor facilities are open for community use anytime outside of school hours. Those facilities include a track, parking lot loop, sports fields, and green space. Because student safety is the school�۪s number one priority, use of its outdoor facilities is not allowed by the community during school hours.

    The school has noticed that a need in the community has been fulfilled as a result of open community use. The school is seen as a valued part of the community, not only because of its importance as an academic institution, but also because it is a convenient resource for exercising, playing, and socializing. Principal Penelope Atkinson feels like the school belongs to the community, so by allowing open community use, the community has a sense of pride and is invested in the school. She notes that open community use has increased the residents�۪ familiarity with school her role as principal and other school administrators, which builds a sense of trust. Principal Atkinson says that it is common for parents to bring their child to an after-school event, such as a team practice, and walk the track or play in the green space with other children while waiting. Open community use provides opportunity and convenience for people of all ages to be active.

    Similar to other schools, Boiling Springs Middle has encountered some barriers associated with open community use. For example, the maintenance staff�۪s duties of picking up trash from the outdoor facilities can take time away from some of their other responsibilities. Also, during the winter months, the outdoor facilities are under-utilized, due to lack of lighting. However, Principal Atkinson mentions that there have been no issues with vandalism, a common concern of open community use.

    Principal Atkinson offers suggestions to other schools that might be considering open community use.

    • Before implementing open community use, ensure that the community will use the facilities. Methods as simple as surveys and advertisements may be helpful in assuring that the community has a need and desire for open community use.
    • Clearly communicate to the community regarding hours of use, trash disposal, and pet policy.
    • Be open to suggestions and input from those who will be using the space.

    Based on her experience with open community use at Boiling Springs Middle School, Principal Atkinson concludes that issues are very minimal compared to the benefits and positive outcomes for the community and school. For this reason, she said that principals should see this as a positive opportunity for their schools instead of a burden.

    The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is encouraging schools and districts to expand open community use statewide. Healthy Eating/Active Living coordinators from DHEC�۪s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity are providing assistance and guidance in an effort to convince schools across South Carolina to make their outdoor facilities available for public use to promote physical activity, healthy lifestyles and stronger communities.

  • School and Community: A Reflection of Each Other School and Community: A Reflection of Each Other Corina Vidaurri | 05/23/2016 Calhoun County High School is located in St Matthews, SC and is at the center of the community.

    calhoun_countyCalhoun County High School (CCHS) is located in St Matthews, SC and is at the center of the community. As an award-winning high school, CCHS received the Bronze Award from US News and World Report for being one of the top high schools in the country for eight consecutive years. Principal Cynthia Johnson has been successful in creating a school environment focused on community engagement and student learning.

    She has made it a priority to allow the community access to the school’s outdoor recreational facilities. That is a big deal in an area where there is a lack of affordable recreational facilities. Principal Johnson is helping fill this void by allowing the community to use the track before and after school. Signs posted on the fences communicate the rules for using the track.
    As a result of opening the school’s outdoor facilities to the community, parents and alumni continue to support the school. At the football games, alumni help clean the facilities after the Saints’ games. Allowing open community use has created a strong community engagement at CCHS. In addition, providing a space for the community to be active creates a healthier community. After visiting the school, it is easy to see that Calhoun County High School explodes with positivity amongst the students, staff, and teachers.

    The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is encouraging schools and districts to expand open community use statewide. Healthy Eating/Active Living coordinators from DHEC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity are providing assistance and guidance in an effort to convince schools across South Carolina to make their outdoor facilities available for public use to promote physical activity, healthy lifestyles, and stronger communities.

  • Bamberg-Ehrhardt: Working Together as a Community Bamberg-Ehrhardt: Working Together as a Community Corina Vidaurri | 05/11/2016 Leon Maxwell has helped make Bamberg-Ehrhardt High School dedicated to wellness!

    BE_HighSchoolBamberg-Ehrhardt High School (B-EHS), home of the Red Raiders, is well known in the community because of the incredible football legacy built by Leon Maxwell over 22 years.  Leon Maxwell�۪s stellar career led to him being inducted in the S.C. Athletic Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 1995. His son, Randall Maxwell, has served as principal at B-EHS for the past 14 years; he has been with the school district for 30 years. Throughout Principal Maxwell�۪s tenure at B-EHS and the school district, open community use has always been allowed. The school allows the community to use the outdoor track and outdoor fields after school hours and when the school is not using the facilities. He said his is a ���small, close community�۝, meaning that everyone does their fair share to pitch in as neighbors. Sports found a way to unite not only the students with the educators but the school as a whole with the members of the community. Community members volunteer to help maintain the facilities, as well as help keep a watchful eye on the outdoor facilities.

    Principal Maxwell is very open to his school being used for positive purposes, such as exercise and leisure. He feels that no one should be turned away from using the outdoor facilities.  The facilities were built for the school, yes, but, the school is a part of the community. For Principal Maxwell, it is not only about allowing people to use the facilities; it is about working together to achieve more.  Aside from open-community use, B-EHS has had school gardens; students sell the produce to the community to create healthy food access.  The students are also involved in a recycling program to teach them not only about community but also about the environment. The Red Raiders are leading the charge in creating a healthier community!

    The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is encouraging schools and districts to expand open community use statewide. Healthy Eating/Active Living coordinators from DHEC�۪s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity are providing assistance and guidance in an effort to convince schools across South Carolina to make their outdoor facilities available for public use to promote physical activity, healthy lifestyles, and stronger communities.

  • Johnsonville High School: A Community Place Johnsonville High School: A Community Place Angela Rogers | 05/09/2016 New upgrades to Johnsonville High make it a center for wellness.

    johnsonvilleJohnsonville High School, “Home of the Golden Flashes,” is located in Johnsonville, SC. In 2000, the tennis courts were built and the track was resurfaced by the school district in conjunction with Florence County. The superintendent at that time (Dr. Dale Strickland) initiated the request of the County to share the costs.

    The tennis courts and track are not directly on the high school campus but are within a half mile between the elementary school and the high school. Both outdoor recreational facilities are available for public use virtually 24/7. Both have lights, but the lights on the tennis courts are on an automatic timer and go off around 9:00 pm. The track is a quarter mile paved circle with markings for lanes and distances. No bikes and skateboards are allowed on the track or tennis courts.

    Community members use the track all during the day; school staff use the track as well. Seniors in the community can be seen walking and socializing on the track throughout the day. As for the courts, individuals do enjoy the courts for a game of tennis.

    These outdoor facilities give the community somewhere to go. Many use the facilities for health or rehabilitation purposes. The track is an even surface, so it is a good place to walk. Allowing public use of these facilities has a positive impact on the health of the community. Principal Sam Tuten shared, “This is a community place. I have to commend the community for taking care of the facilities.” The school does its part by keeping the facilities safe and providing lighting.

    Staying true to its Alma Mater, “In the East of Florence County, ‘neath the sky so blue, stands our noble Alma Mater, glorious to view. Lift the chorus, speed it onward, may it never fail; Hail to thee our Alma Mater, Johnsonville all hail.”

    The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is encouraging schools and districts to expand open community use statewide. Healthy Eating/Active Living coordinators from DHEC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity are providing assistance and guidance in an effort to convince schools across South Carolina to make their outdoor facilities available for public use to promote physical activity, healthy lifestyles, and stronger communities.

load more posts
 

Stay Informed

Want to know about all the events , newly added locations and all things that eating smart and moving more offers? Subscribe to stay informed.